(Useless) knowledge - facts and figures you always wanted to know about the island
Bansin © Andreas Dumke
Boats lying on the beach of Bansin overlooking the sea at low tide. | Imperial Baths Usedom

"Island of the Sun", "Island of Light" or "Germany's sunniest island" - the island of Usedom has received many nicknames, which can be traced back to the fact that the most hours of sunshine over the year are recorded here. More than 1900 hours a year. Especially in the summer months, the radiant Klarchen often shines from a cloudless sky. She likes to appear early in the morning as a glowing red ball of fire over the sea, while in the evening she sinks over the backwaters. It's a good thing that the sun rises in the east - so it's a permanent guest on the island.

In order to get to the imperial baths in Ahlbeck Heringsdorf Bansin, there is hardly a way around it: the Peene Bridge in Wolgast. The structure is 255,9 meters long, more than 15.000 cubic meters of concrete and more than 2.000 tons of steel were used. Depending on the season, the bascule bridge is opened up to six times a day, and it opens and closes a whopping 1825 times a year. That means waiting, waiting, waiting again and again, up to 15 minutes plus backwater, to get on or off the island. All in all, that's up to 90 minutes a day, mind you on a day with few ships. That's 32.850 minutes or almost 23 days a year that the island cannot be reached on foot, by train or by car. After all, the Zecheriner Brücker is only open nine days a year – fortunately not in one go.

Once on the island, many don't want to leave and come back year after year. This is not only due to our fine, white and endless sandy beach, but also to the historical, maritime and incomparable flair. Last but not least, the jewels of spa architecture contribute to this in a special way. The Imperial Spas have a variety and density of mansions, magnificent palaces and fairytale castles that is second to none. There are also three gems that stand with their loose end in the middle of the water. This raises the question: Why are these buildings named despite the pier? However. The older, the more beautiful. The longer, the more attractive. And the imperial baths have both to offer: the oldest pier in Germany in Ahlbeck from 1898 and the longest pier in Germany with a length of 508 meters in Heringsdorf. Have you walked across water without getting wet?

Six by four by three meters - these are the dimensions of the largest beach chair in the world. Where is he? In Heringsdorf. 3,5 cubic meters of wood, 85 square meters of fabric, three kilometers of braiding and 1.000 hours were used to create this top-class beach chair. You have to be quick to get a seat - after all, only 91 people fit in. If it gets too tight, thank God we still have beach chairs available on the beach. Then you have it to yourself.